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10 Best Museums of Contemporary Art In Europe

Posted by smith on

Overview

Europe is one of the most vibrant art destinations. It is more so when it comes to contemporary art. Consequently, visiting a museum in Europe will help you interact with great minds and great ideas of contemporary works. Here are the 10 Best Museums of Contemporary Art In Europe:

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In Europe

Tate, UK

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeTate is a museum that has the modern collection of British art. The facility is not categorized as a government institution. However, its main sponsor is Department for Culture, Media and Sport. The museum has collected both the national and international art that was created from 1900 to the present. It is the most striking and the most visited art gallery in the UK.

Centre Pompidou-Metz

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeThe museum is located in Metz, Lorraine, France. It is the largest art exhibition in France that is located outside Paris. Exhibitions are constantly rotated, in fact in every six months. The museum features a unique and an aesthetic roof in the model of a Chinese hat. In every year, the museum features three to four exhibitions on temporary basis.

Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In Europe

Guggenheim Bilbao museum was founded in 1997 and it is constructed in the view of the Nervion River. It exhibits modern art that runs from mid-century but upto the present. The museum has an emphasis on art products that have a European-American axis. Every year, tourists troop to Abando, Bilbao, in order to see its art exhibitions, a phenomenon known by the locals as the Bilbao effect.

Kröller-Müller, Netherlands

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeThe museum has a strong exhibition of Van Gogh works, actually the second largest of such works. The management gives the children gifts that enable them appreciate art, the museum game for instance.
The museum features the following: a sculpture garden, paintings, drawings, and the works of prominent artists such as Seurat Signat and Issac Israels. Generally, the museum shows a symbiotic relationship between architecture, art and nature.

Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeThe museum is one of the largest and equipped in Germany. It exhibits both the old and modern art. The contemporary art is housed under the Galerie der Gegenwart. The reason why the museum is popular is because art enthusiasts can encounter exploding art that pertains the various socio-political issues.

The Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, S.M. A.K.

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeSMAK (known in English as City Museum for Contemporary Art), is a modern art which is located in the Belgium city of Ghent. It is popular for a provocative exhibition of art as well as exhibits on prominent artists such as Karel Appel and Andy Warhol.

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Spain

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeLocated in Madrid, the museum is a collection of 20th century art. The museum has a collection of Spanish art such as the works of Pablo Picasso. In addition to that, there are international work pieces, not many though, such as the work of Donald Judd.

The Sepentine Sackler, UK

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeThe Sepentine Sackler is one of the two art galleries that are located in Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park. The art facility is a fusion of the new and the old. A lot of innovation has been done in recent years.

Castello di Rivoli, Italy

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeAn exploration of art in Italy is not complete without the mention of the contribution of Italians to art in the classical, Renaissance, and contemporary eras. This museum has permanent collections, video collections, as well as audio-visual materials. Various artistic professionals and people working in artistic disciplines can hold a symposium as well as round tables.

Kumu Art Museum, Estonia

Best Museums of Contemporary Art In EuropeLocated in Tallinn, Estonia, this museum of contemporary art was opened in 2006. It deals with both temporary and permanent collections. In addition to that, it shows features of non-conformist art.

Conclusion

The value of art in the society cannot be underestimated. There are museums in Europe which have done outstanding work in showcasing European and international contemporary art, and such noble efforts are still going on.

Culture

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and Customs

Posted by smith on

Overview

The European culture is shaped by different elements, including history and religion. As much as Europe is culturally diverse, there are certain distinct values, traditions and customs, which are characteristically European. Over the last few years, a lot has changed in Europe, in terms of family life, work and even the society as a whole. Here are important facts about European traditions and customs.

Portugal – St. John Festival

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsOn the night of June the 23rd every year, the city of Porto becomes crazy and lively. Hundreds, if not thousands of people meet in the city center to pay their tributes to St. John the Baptist. As a show of solidarity, people hit each other with soft plastic hammers or with garlic flowers. These festivities have been happening in the city for more than 600 years. As it stands, it is one of the most important festivals in the city of Porto. As a matter of fact, the festival has now become a tourist attraction.

France – Omelette géante

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsIn several French villages, a giant omelet, comprising of around 4500 eggs is served at the city’s center square. It can feed more than 1,000 people. This tradition has been happening since Napoleon’s time, and does not seem to go away any time soon. Legend has it that Napoleon stopped in a small town one day to have an omelet. He loved it so much that he ordered people to pool their eggs together and make a large one.

Spain – La Tomatina

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsDuring the last Wednesday of August, people get involved in a tomato fight, and throw more than 40 metric tonnes of tomatoes. This happens in a small Valencian town of Buñol. They do this merely for fun. This festival has been going on for more than 50 years. It started when one person missed an animal that was eating melons, and hit another with a tomato. The event slowly picked up to what it has become today.

Iceland – Month of Þorri

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsEvery January, most people in Iceland celebrate the feast of Thorri. During this feast, Icelanders eat some of the most disgusting food in the world. This might include things like sour ram testicles, blood pudding, fermented shark, live sausage and boiled sheep heads. The feast is meant to celebrate traditional foods. Initially, people used to smoke, bury, ferment or salt their food. This has become a modern delicacy. People who are able to eat such food depict a lot of strength and might.

Sweden – Frog Dance

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsMidway through summer celebrations, Swedes congregate around a maypole, stop everything, then start dancing and singing around the pole. During the singing, they mimic the sounds produced by frogs. What is not clear is how this whole festival started, since they sing along to a popular song used during the French revolution.

Finland – Wife Carrying

Interesting Facts about European Traditions and CustomsFinnish people have some of the oddest traditions and customs in Europe. One of the events is the popular Wife Carrying. During this event, male competitors race against each other, while carrying a wife, who is the teammate. The person who posts the fastest time after completing the race is pronounced the winner.

Travel

7 Things You Don’t Know About the Northern Lights In Iceland

Posted by smith on

Overview

Things You Don't Know About the Northern Lights In IcelandThe northern lights are one of the most popular tourist attractions in Iceland. Every year, thousands of nature lovers visit this island in the arctic, just to view this natural phenomenon. However, they also tend to be highly unpredictable and elusive.

Although they appear during a certain period, several factors come into play, when it comes to seeing them. They include weather, location, and season and most importantly luck. There are no guarantees that you will see them when you visit at a certain time of the year. Before you book your trip, here are 7 things you don’t know about the northern lights in Iceland. We had some help from Iceland Buddy Northern Light Tour Guide to get some valuable travel advice into our article and I want to thank them for their input here, visit them here.

Don’t Plan Your Trip around Them

As you probably know, nature plays by its own rules. You wake up to a bright sunny day, clouds appear out of nowhere and suddenly it’s raining. The same case applies to the northern lights… Therefore, if you intend to visit Iceland to see the Northern lights, you might be disappointed. Plan your trip around the fantastic opportunities available, and you might just be lucky.

They are Unpredictable

Things You Don't Know About the Northern Lights In IcelandYou need a clear, dark night, in order to see them properly. They mainly appear from mid-September all the way to March. You can catch them anytime between 6am to 6pm. Additionally, solar wind or solar flares on the sun should be present. There are also Aurora forecasts that you can use. However, nothing is certain.

Arctic Weather Changes Drastically

Equally unpredictable is the arctic weather. You can encounter sunshine, hail, snow, sleet, and high winds, all in a single day. Therefore, just because you woke up to a sunny day does not mean it will be like that throughout out. If you manage to catch them, take photos and just enjoy the moment. It might be raining the next minute.

Go to the Countryside

As previously indicated, it has to be dark and clear outside, for a chance to see the Northern lights. Such conditions are mostly found outside the city, where there isn’t much pollution. They are only visible when they are strongest in cities like Tromsø and Reykjavik. However, if you want a better view, head over to the countryside.

Appears in a Color Spectrum

Things You Don't Know About the Northern Lights In IcelandThe Northern lights are a combination of unique colors which include white-gray. These colors are usually created by atmospheric height and the spectrum of the Earth’s colors. Your naked eye will mostly see the green light, since it tends to be the most dominant. They also appear in white-gray sometimes, depending on the color-dispersion.

Length of Your Stay

As much as it appears like a marketing cue, the length of your stay in Iceland will also determine whether you can see them or not. To increase your chances of seeing the Northern lights, then you should stay at least 7 days in the expected months.

Conclusion

The Northern lights are awesome and spectacular. Everyone should make an attempt to see them, at least once during their lifetime. The above tips are just a guide on how to organize your trip and to increase your chances of seeing them.